Perfect is good. Done is better.

Remember that idea you’ve been sitting on?

I’m here with the swift kick in the pants.

While you’re waiting for the absolute right time to launch that business of yours, someone else is coming up with the same exact idea.

Except they are implementing on it.

Ideas are like water, folks. Really. My first startup, U Sphere, was really not anything new — a portal for college-bound students to connect with colleges.

In my case, the right time presented itself and I launched and didn’t look back.

It wasn’t wildly successful, but that’s okay — I learned a ton. Including what not to do next time. How to test and learn. What type of people to avoid working with — and who to gravitate toward.

Groupon? Nothing new, right? People buy stuff at a discount. One deal a day. Part Woot, part coupon site.

Oh yeah, and they probably hit a couple bumps in the road when they launched. But they were — are — first to market. HUGE advantage. Category killer — even though, again, not really a completely original idea. Beside the point.

You. Have. An. Idea.

Implement. Execute.

Perfect is good. Done is better.

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Comments

  1. To take this concept even further I would say ideas themselves are worthless, and executing on a bad idea, no matter how determined you are, is not a good idea. Learning, then acting on the lessons learned, is the definition of entrepreneurship. Most entrepreneurs first ideas are truly terrible. The process of entrepreneurship is not simply “get off your butt and execute that idea before someone else does” but instead, figure out why that idea won’t work and what will. You mentioned Groupon, and they are a great example of this principal in action. Groupon was originally The Point. They didn’t figure out local, once-a-day deals until The Point had flopped.

    mixergy interview with Groupon founder:
    http://mixergy.com/andrew-mason-groupon-interview/

    Eric Ries on “The Pivot”:
    http://www.startuplessonslearned.com/2009/06/pivot-dont-jump-to-new-vision.html

  2. To take this concept even further I would say ideas themselves are worthless, and executing on a bad idea, no matter how determined you are, is not a good idea. Learning, then acting on the lessons learned, is the definition of entrepreneurship. Most entrepreneurs first ideas are truly terrible. The process of entrepreneurship is not simply “get off your butt and execute that idea before someone else does” but instead, figure out why that idea won't work and what will. You mentioned Groupon, and they are a great example of this principal in action. Groupon was originally The Point. They didn't figure out local, once-a-day deals until The Point had flopped.

    mixergy interview with Groupon founder:
    http://mixergy.com/andrew-mason-groupon-interview/

    Eric Ries on “The Pivot”:
    http://www.startuplessonslearned.com/2009/06/pi

  3. davevandewalle says:

    Great points, Sean…learning from failure is VERY important.

  4. I forget who said it, but I’ve remembered this quote ever since I first saw it: “If something is worth doing, it’s worth doing badly.”Essentially the same as what you say.Of course, in business you don’t want to rush headlong into a venture before some assessment of the opportunities and threats, but I agree that getting the ball rolling and fixing problems as they pop up is better than procrastinating.(EDIT: Sorry, thought OpenID would’ve added my name automatically — I’m Kimmo Linkama)

  5. I forget who said it, but I've remembered this quote ever since I first saw it: “If something is worth doing, it's worth doing badly.”

    Essentially the same as what you say.

    Of course, in business you don't want to rush headlong into a venture before some assessment of the opportunities and threats, but I agree that getting the ball rolling and fixing problems as they pop up is better than procrastinating.

    (EDIT: Sorry, thought OpenID would've added my name automatically — I'm Kimmo Linkama)

  6. Just had visions of Seth Godin and my Dad rush through my head. Can’t wait to get in front of my team tomorrow — we’ve had 4 killer ideas on the dry erase board (likely turned permanent). They launch by Monday. Our perceived obstacle: time. I brag about being a warrior against complacency and I’ve allowed us to sit on our hands. Thanks for the wake up call Dave.

  7. Just had visions of Seth Godin and my Dad rush through my head. Can't wait to get in front of my team tomorrow — we've had 4 killer ideas on the dry erase board (likely turned permanent). They launch by Monday. Our perceived obstacle: time. I brag about being a warrior against complacency and I've allowed us to sit on our hands. Thanks for the wake up call Dave.

  8. Dave,

    Perfect timing with your tweet this morning, was writing a blog post in my head on this very subject. Loved Kimmo’s quote, well played. As is Sean’s point about learning from mistakes.

    I’ll add this: Perfect is a Myth, an illusion like control. It’ll never be perfect for everyone, each customer or reviewer, each reporter or blogger. Plan ahead, manage those bumps in the road, get going and get it done. Great advice.

  9. Dave,

    Perfect timing with your tweet this morning, was writing a blog post in my head on this very subject. Loved Kimmo’s quote, well played. As is Sean’s point about learning from mistakes.

    I’ll add this: Perfect is a Myth, an illusion like control. It’ll never be perfect for everyone, each customer or reviewer, each reporter or blogger. Plan ahead, manage those bumps in the road, get going and get it done. Great advice.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] For Added Value #2, here is a great thought to jump-start your week. It’s from Dave Van de Walle at Area224.com: [...]

  2. [...] wait, launch now, DONE is better. Get to market early, and pay attention. Flexibility and adaptability give you speed an agility, [...]

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